PILLOW TALK 1959

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PILLOW TALK 1959

Hollywood
*sings* "Wonder how it would be to have someone to pillow talk with me?"



Songs and Memories synopsis/review of "Pillow Talk":

This one took Doris right to the top and kept her there. Co-Starring Rock Hudson and Tony Randall, everything worked, and Doris got her first Oscar nomination.  A smart comedy even by today’s standards, the only thing missing was some better songs. The title tune was popular.

The fabulously successful Pillow Talk was essentially the model for romantic comedies of the late 50's and early 60's, and Day and Hudson became the most popular romantic duo on the big screen.  Today, they are still recognized that way.

The story involves Playboy composer Brad Allen ( Rock Hudson) and interior-decorator Jan Morrow ( Doris  Day) who are obliged to share a telephone party line. Naturally, their calls overlap at the least opportune times, and just as naturally, this leads to Hudson and  Day despising each other without ever having met in person.

In a cute but  convenient coincidence, Doris' boy friend is Jonathan Forbes (Tony Randall), who also happens to be Hudson's best pal. Once Hudson gets a glimpse of Day, it's lust/love at first sight. To avoid revealing that he's her telephone rival, Hudson poses as Rex, a wealthy Texan who turns the charm on Day. It works until she agrees to go away with him for a long weekend. While Rock is out getting firewood, Doris straightens his coat, and out drops  a song sheet.  As she plays the notes on a piano, she instantly recognizes the tune that she has heard hundreds of times crooned over the phone by Brad to his stable of girlfriends. When he returns, she confronts him, he apologizes, telling her he has fallen in love with her, she starts packing...wants nothing more to do with him.  At that convenient moment, Jonathan (Tony) shows up just in time to take Doris as far away from Hudson as possible.  

Problem: both have fallen in love. Rock wants her back; she hates him and will not see him. In a funny scene between Rock and Doris' maid (played by Thelma Ritter), she tells him the way to get her back: "she's a decorator. You have an apartment to be decorated."  Doris accepts the job only if given carte blanche.


 She gets even by  decorating Hudson's apartment in an unbelievably  hideous manner. But Hudson loves her all the same; he "kidnaps" her, carrying her through the streets in her nightgown in full view of everyone, including a laughing cop who refuses to intervene.  When they arrive at the newly-decorated apartment, he tells her she can have it...that he was planning to propose to her once she had finished.  As can be guessed, they make amends and  end up together.

PillowTalk is still one of the best of the frothy Doris Day-Rock Hudson vehicles; it  made a fortune at the box office and garnered five Oscar nominations, and was one of the Big Ten Films for 1959. It took both Rock and Doris to the top of all the movie star polls of that year, and they became the screen romantic couple of the 50's.
"I think Doris is a very sexy lady who doesn't know how sexy she is.  That's the integral part of her charm.  Beautiful Doris with that fantastic body, all sweetness and charm up front, and that turns people on, and I don't think she could have had the success she's had if she didn't have this sexy whirlpool frothing around underneath her All-American-girl exterior."
"...she was the Fred Astaire of comedy."
"Making a movie with Doris was a piece of cake---a sexy ride on her coattails all the way.

~James Garner  R.I.P.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

mikeydv
Administrator
There are really a lot of pictures (probably at least a few hundred) taken of DD and Rock during the filming of PILLOW TALK.  This would be a great place to put some of them.











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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

cjoyjohnson@bellsouth.net
Administrator
This is one of my very favorites of Doris' movies.
Doris and Rock just had the best chemistry together.  Many fans thought they were an item..not the case...but they were very good friends until his passing. They always remained best of friends and kept in touch as often.

I wish they could have made more movies together..they were so funny.

   
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

cjoyjohnson@bellsouth.net
Administrator
This post was updated on .


They were just the cutest couple together in their three movies.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj0oXqu36nk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z21shqPRTP8

I remember this like it was yesterday when I watched Doris and Rock on her "Best Friends" tv show.  I cried through the whole segment.  It was so hard to watch Doris talk about her good friend but the interview visit was wonderful.  I have all these shows taped from my old VCR and wouldn't trade them for the world.  We miss you Rock and so does Doris.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

Barbara
This post was updated on .
Pillow Talk is my all time favorite of all of Doris movies. I never get tired of watching it. One lady wrote on my Doris site on Facebook. "  Have to admit... it's hard for me to watch the shows with them together anymore. Not easy to imagine that it's a real couple. Which I responded with, " Cindi, I will always continue to watch her movies, there will always be a warm place in my heart for her and her movies. They don't make movies like the ones she made anymore. And "Pillow Talk" will always be one of my all time favorites."
Getting back to this movie Pillow Talk, With Doris and Rock,  their first film was to nurture an immediate bond between the two who had barely met before. However, it was a well publicized fact at the time that Rock had been a massive fan of Doris [or Eunice as he would call her] since her big-band days when he was serving in the Navy.
"It was evening, and we passed under the Golden Gate Bridge...its lights went on, and the voice of Doris Day began singing 'Sentimental Journey' over the loudspeakers. Well, that was the saddest bunch of sailors you ever saw. She had the whole ship in tears, including me. Fifteen years later, Doris and I worked together for the first time in Pillow Talk and by way of contrast, it was laughter all the way."Before we got under way, I had some apprehensions. I had never played comedy before, and here I was, thrown together with one of Hollywood’s most accomplished comedians...but the best acting lesson came from Doris - her sense of timing, her instincts - I just kept my eyes open and copied her. I don’t really know what makes a movie team....I’d say, first of all, the two people have to truly like each other, as Doris and I did, for that shines through..."  - Rock Hudson.
So Yes Rock!! I would say you both had a special friendship and chemistry that formed into a lasting warm friendship that not even many married couples share. ♥ And to this day I know Doris misses her "Buddy"..♥
A lot of these first pictures I will post are ones I have painted from black and white photos of them.























"Stay With The Happy People" ♫ ♪♫
Barbara Norton
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

Barbara
This post was updated on .
Trailer for "Pillow Talk"


Doris sings "Possess Me" From the movie. ♪ ♫


Want Some Dip?



Rock "The Wink"  "You dog you."








"Stay With The Happy People" ♫ ♪♫
Barbara Norton
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

Sinem
This is my favorite DD movie. ♥ ♥ ♥















































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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

Sinem










































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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

Sinem






































































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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

fluffy cloud




Soooooooooooooooooooo many pics.I do love the last one,it gives you a sense of peace in this "roaring" world.Love the movie,but,hey,who does not?
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

janetmoore
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Here's the script signed by Doris.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

Barbara
Wow!! love all the picture everyone is finding on this movie, a few I haven't seen and a few I haven't seen in a long while. Would have been so wonderful if that had made a "Pillow Talk" part 2 while they were both still young. 
"Stay With The Happy People" ♫ ♪♫
Barbara Norton
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959 (The start of Doris and Rock)

mikeydv
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That is supposed to be what LOVER COME BACK was supposed to be.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959

fluffy cloud
In reply to this post by Hollywood






Well the most popular of them all.It's a good thing they put those two people together,sheer magic,chums for life.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959

Sinem
























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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959

Hollywood
In reply to this post by Hollywood
My Personal review of “Pillow Talk”



What do you say about a film that is this special?  I wasn’t sure I was gonna have ANYTHING to say about “Pillow Talk“, b/c what can you say about this film that hasn’t been said or that we don’t already know?  But there are some things I feel need to be said about this film nonetheless.  Besides Me?  Not comment on a Doris Day film on here??  Not my style.  hehe

This is one of those films where the stars just align perfectly to where every element of this film is cinema magic.  There is a very good reason why this film was entered into the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 2009 for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant and preserved.  (Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pillow_Talk_%28film%29 )  The success and hype is worthy of this film and it easily makes my Top 3 of Favorite Doris Films.



I heard that Ross Hunter, the producer, had trouble selling this film to the theatres.  
From http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053172/trivia?ref_=tt_trv_trv : “Ross Hunter wrote that after he made this film, no theatre managers wanted to book it.  Popular movie themes at the time were war films, westerns, or spectacles.  Hunter was told by the big movie chains that sophisticated comedies like “Pillow Talk” went out with William Powell.  They also believed Doris Day and Rock Hudson were things of the past and had been overtaken by newer stars.  Hunter persuaded Sol Schwartz, who owned the Palace Theatre in New York, to book the film for a two-week run, and it was a smash hit.  The public had been starved for romantic comedy, and theatre owners who had previously turned down Ross Hunter now had to deal with him on HIS terms.”  Good for him.

I’m assuming the other reason Hunter had trouble selling it and why it’s in the National Film Registry is it is a commentary on where we were in regards to sexuality at the time; right smack in the middle between the release of the Kinsey Reports and the Sexual Revolution. Comfortable to talk about sex but not ready to show it, which I think works real well for this era of Sex Comedies.  (I wish they would have understood this subtly when they made “Down with Love”, a so-called tribute to these films, especially in the split-screen.)  

Or maybe it’s because Hunter saw something in Doris that many before this film weren’t seeing:  “No one guessed that under all those dimples lurked one of the wildest asses in Hollywood.”   Hunter knew a good thing when he saw it.  Bless you Ross Hunter!



My Favorite segment in the film takes place from the start of the “Roly Poly” scene with Perry Blackwell, to them making out, until Tony Randall takes her away from “Brad Allen“ with the sensuous “Possess Me” situated beautifully in the middle of all this.  I need a fan when I watch this section.  So Passionate!




In summary: Rock and Doris’ Chemistry is off the charts.  There is a simplicity and elegance about the clothes Jean Louis designed which Doris correctly said suited her more than what she had previously worn on film and the Jewels by Laykin et Cie perfectly compliment these fine gowns.  



The music by (Frank) DeVol is so appropriate.  And the so-called 2nd Bananas in Tony Randall and Thelma Ritter are superb.  I enjoyed their scenes almost as much as those with Doris and Rock.  No wonder Doris worked with all of them again.  The only reason I’m surprised Doris and Thelma got Oscar nominations is that the Oscars don’t usually favor comedies.  But again, this film is special.  Not only did Rock compliment Doris on her acting, but so did Tony Randall.  He said that during the crying back to New York scene, she would cry on cue and didn’t know how good she was.  But we know, don’t we?  I just love, Love, LOVE this film!

"I think Doris is a very sexy lady who doesn't know how sexy she is.  That's the integral part of her charm.  Beautiful Doris with that fantastic body, all sweetness and charm up front, and that turns people on, and I don't think she could have had the success she's had if she didn't have this sexy whirlpool frothing around underneath her All-American-girl exterior."
"...she was the Fred Astaire of comedy."
"Making a movie with Doris was a piece of cake---a sexy ride on her coattails all the way.

~James Garner  R.I.P.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959

Hollywood
Iconic Dress from Oscars Ceremony April 4th, 1960:





"I think Doris is a very sexy lady who doesn't know how sexy she is.  That's the integral part of her charm.  Beautiful Doris with that fantastic body, all sweetness and charm up front, and that turns people on, and I don't think she could have had the success she's had if she didn't have this sexy whirlpool frothing around underneath her All-American-girl exterior."
"...she was the Fred Astaire of comedy."
"Making a movie with Doris was a piece of cake---a sexy ride on her coattails all the way.

~James Garner  R.I.P.
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Re: PILLOW TALK 1959

PettlesTake2
In reply to this post by fluffy cloud
Some pretty special photos here.

Thank you.