Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

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Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

Nick
This post was updated on .
Thoughts and prayers with those in Oklahoma.

Donation Link:  http://www.redcross.org/ .  They lost everything!

Twenty-mile path up to 2-miles wide.  It was on the ground for AN HOUR!  I'll never take the warnings lightly after seeing this.  This gives you an idea of the power and magnitude.  One guy said:  "They are supposed to sound like a train . . . but I have never heard a train sound like that!"  I am sure you have heard the news, but these videos say more than words could ever say.  

The formation of the Tornado near Newcastle, OK building power as it heads towards the City of Moore.  High definition videos that open to full-screen if you slide the bar at the bottom of the post to the right.  Then you can see the full-screen button on each video.


Another view as it approaches the City of Moore.  Before and immediately after.


An hour later.
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

janetmoore
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Horrible! I can't imagine that kind of devastation.
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

Nick
I heard on the radio today that the EF-5 Moore Tornado had 6-times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb, and possibly as much as several HUNDRED times that much!  It was really digging into the ground as you can see in the videos.  Those cars were being tossed around like tin cans, as well as houses, farm animals, etc.  There were 17 horses found dead in one field.  One car landed on top of the medical center.  It is amazing that only 24-people died.  They had 16-minutes warning and it was daylight.  Imagine if it was night . . .
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

mikeydv
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Mother Nature can sometimes be a real b......!
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

cjoyjohnson@bellsouth.net
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That is so scary...everytime we have a really bad storm here it scares me to death.

I head for the bathroom since there are no windows and an inside wall.
Might have to jump in the tub if it gets too bad....Mike teases me about that all the time...could save my life.
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

Nick
I have always been concerned and fascinated about Tornados since I was a kid.  Used to have recurring tornado dreams where I had to warn everybody; and of course in the dream they weren't concerned at all.  Finally in one dream the tornado caught up to me, and fizzled-out.   

I've been involved with at least three or four of them, but escaped without personal injury, and only tree damage.  Drove right into one once and the truck engine cut-out as well as every one else on the road too.  Just had to sit there as the hail pounded us.  There was one here last year that touched down about 3-miles from my house.  It destroyed a subdivision.  So I know what you mean Carol.  Scary!

Another time I just pulled up in my car in the driveway, out in the country, and the tornado was going by.  The trees were bent over horizontal and I couldn't run 20 feet from my car to the house to take shelter, because there was too much stuff blowing in the air and the wind was so strong I didn't think I would make it.  Then wind started picking up my big Blue station wagon's weight off its springs (that I was sitting in.)  I was afraid it was going to pick it up and fly me away in the car, and there was nothing I could do.  I prayed.  When it past, all was well except, the huge 100+ year old oak tree came crashing down.  But nothing like the EF-5 twister in OK!

Yes, sometimes Mother Nature can be a really "bad girl."  Is that what you meant to say Mike?
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

Susan
My thoughts and prayers are also to the people of Moore. Tornadoes are very scary. On June 6th,1990 the town of Limon were I grew up and lived for 44 years, my parents still there there was hit by a half mile wide F-4 tornado and 80% of the town was destroyed, 14 people were hurt, no one was killed. I never in my life want to have to go through that again. My parents were both born and my dad grew up in Oklahoma. Our town is better in some ways but in others ways not so much. When a storm comes we all pay attention and sometimes re live moments of that day, you never forget. Please stay safe my friends!
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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

Nick
This post was updated on .
My nephew just moved from Oklahoma to Ohio.  The fear and awe one experiences is never forgotten.  I heard a guy who called into a national radio program who saw the tornado in Newcastle, OK (where the tornado first formed- first video posted above.)  He was emotionally shaken just talking about it, and said that he was so in awe, that the whole event changed his atheist viewpoint to a non-atheist.  A large part of that was the way people helped each other in the aftermath - no complaining, just helping.  Who do you blame?  And what good would it do? It leaves one in awesome wonder . . . changed forever!

The worst Tornado in history (still to this day) was "The Tri-State Tornado of 1925."  It was an F5, that lasted for 3.5 HOURS, and traveled across three states: Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana - a 219 mile path of destruction, in total killing about 700 people.  There was no warning, and it didn't even look like a tornado, and so many veteran weather-reading farmers where caught off guard.

These are rare pictures of it.  Kind of a contrast with the music, but it sets the tone of the era.


Tri-State Tornado survivors talk


The actual film of Tri-State Tornado damage  as viewed from an airplane.  This is mind-boggling!  It just goes on and on . . . hard to believe.

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Re: Oklahoma Tornado Disaster

Nick
Some final thoughts.  Activist, songwriter, and singer Pete Seger put the song together, borrowing from Ecclesiastes.  



The Byrds, Terry Melcher producer, took it to another level.  This song says it all when you think of the Moore Tornado, or whatever. . . Truly a great song of understanding and healing.